All Articles

Scotland strategy bearing fruit

By Ross Ferguson Something that caught the eye of many colleagues in England was the announcement that the Scottish Government was providing dedicated funding for the Additional Cost of Teaching (ACT) of experiential learning (EL) for pharmacy undergraduates for 2018-19. The hope is that this fantastic and pragmatic initiative will not only reimburse the costs involved, but that it will help to expand and enhance the quality of EL in hospital, community and primary care.

Insight: Govt warns against stockpiling but many pharmacies see no other option

By Alexander Humphries* As I write this I am sitting in my bunker surrounded by boxes of stock. I know we have been told not to stockpile but to my mind it is a case of ‘needs must’ for my patients...

Numark MD’s five-point plan for community pharmacy

By Jeremy Meader, managing director of Numark Does NHS England or the Department of Health and Social Care recognise and appreciate fully the contribution of community pharmacy? We all know the answer to that, but actually it is the wrong question. What we need to ask is how we can change that dynamic, move forward and secure a future that is financially sustainable, improves outcomes for patients and demonstrably helps the NHS address the huge challenges it faces.

Welsh CPhO: Pharmacy must play to its strengths

By Andrew Evans, chief pharmaceutical officer for Welsh Government Independent community pharmacy understands the needs of communities because it is part of those communities – but there are very real threats to its future. These threats are not from governments, automation, hub-and-spoke, changes in supervision, or clinical pharmacists in GP practices – believe it or not, these are opportunities. The threats don’t even come from Brexit. The real threat is a change in consumer behaviour and a failure of pharmacies to adapt to that change. We are mistaken if we believe citizens will continue to access pharmacies in the same way and for the same reasons they do now.

Prevention is the way forward

By NPA policy manager Helga Mangion The Government has said ‘prevention is better than cure’ will be at the heart of the NHS Long-Term Plan. A key goal will be to improve healthy life expectancy by at least five extra years by 2035 and to close the gap between the richest and poorest. That closely resembles one of the acid tests the NPA recently set out for the Long-Term NHS Plan, namely – will the poorest patients and communities benefit from the new investment promised? Other success criteria suggested by the NPA for the long-term plan seem to find a mirror in the vision document that accompanied Mr Hancock’s speech.

Insight: Behaviour gone bad

By Alexander Humphries Last week I decided to confront one of my most difficult patients. It was not an easy thing to do but it was necessary – and the outcome was rather surprising...

Don’t make us an afterthought

By Stephen Fishwick, head of communications, National Pharmacy Association The scope of the new NHS 10-year plan will be wide-ranging, addressing priorities from ‘putting the patient at the heart of how we organise care’ to harnessing the power of innovation and empowering the healthcare workforce. There will also be a focus on prevention and achieving ‘true parity’ of care between mental and physical health. Pharmacy has lots to offer in all these areas. That is why one of the acid tests of the long-term plan should be this: Come the NHS’s 80th birthday, 10 years from now, will the potential of the entire health and social care workforce have been realised – not only doctors and nurses but local pharmacists and many others too?

Home deliveries need not break the bank

There are so many ways you can save money when you offer a home delivery service, says Aberystwyth pharmacist Gary Jones, developer of the Pro Delivery Manager (PDM) app

NICE touch – but will NHS England listen?

Will the recent NICE guidance, which focuses on how community pharmacies can help maintain and improve people’s physical and mental health, also focus the minds of NHS England and Public Health England? Mike Holden from Pharmacy Complete hopes so

Insight: Reasons to be cheerful

By Alexander Humphries I am refreshed and raring to go after the summer holidays. Apart from the next six months being hellish regarding the comings and goings of staff as they continue their personal journeys of maternity leave, promotion, leavers and new starters, there is plenty to be optimistic about. For a start, we apparently have a Secretary of State who wants to invest in pharmacy – at least until his civil servants get their hooks into him. This is something we haven’t had in a very long time. I feel optimistic, as I always have been, that Government and NHS England are running out of time and options for getting a grip on the health service.

Inspection reports must not mislead

By NPA policy manager Helga Mangion NOWADAYS it is easier than ever to access and share information and this raises expectations in terms of transparency and customer service. The performance of schools, the cleanliness of restaurants and MPs’ expenses are all available at the click of a mouse. NHS Choices encourages patients to review their pharmacy, GP, dentist and other health providers online but, unlike these other providers, the pharmacy regulator does not currently publish its reports. The GPhC consultation, ‘Developing our approach to regulating registered pharmacies’, reflects some of these issues. The NPA agrees with the principle of the publication of reports, provided they are not misleading to the public. Reports should contain only data that informs consumer decision-making, uncluttered by technical details that are useless for that purpose.

Give pharmacy its fair share of the £20bn

By Steve Anderson, group managing director of Phoenix Uk I appreciate that we will need to wait until the autumn statement to find out how the additional £20bn funding for the NHS will be allocated, but I support the efforts by the RPS and others to argue the case for a fair proportion to be channelled through community pharmacy in order to improve patient access to healthcare and reduce the strain on GPs and A&E departments. We have seen the successful implementation of a care-based contractual model in Scotland and a recent commitment to increased funding there for community pharmacy.

An anniversary well worth remembering

By Jeremy Holmes, former chief executive and registrar of the RPSGB. One hundred and fifty years ago on July 31, the 1868 Pharmacy Act provided the foundations for what was to become the profession of pharmacy. At the time there was no such person as a “pharmacist” – there were either apothecaries (who eventually evolved into GPs) or chemists and druggists. We wouldn’t be where we are today without the legislation of 150 years ago. The Act established many things we now take for granted, such as including the seller’s name and address on all drug packaging. It was also the first time the dispensing of poisons other than arsenic had been controlled.

Slow release of technician report not helpful

By Ross Ferguson There is no doubt we need a discussion about the pharmacy team and the roles and responsibilities within it, so the Pharmacists’ Defence Association (PDA) report is probably to be welcomed. I say probably, because we haven’t actually seen the report, only what the PDA has chosen to release through its website in a well-controlled manner. Namely: Pharmacy technicians don’t want to be responsible for supervising pharmacies The PDA has raised concerns that the public may be potentially “confused or misled” about the capabilities of pharmacy technicians. Unsurprisingly, all this has rankled what I assume is an already tense relationship with our pharmacy technician colleagues and the Association of Pharmacy Technicians (UK) in particular.

Insight: The elephant in the room

By Alexander Humphries* A new member of staff recently asked me how some brown stains had come to mark the ceiling of the dispensary. It was odd, she said, because it is a very high ceiling. I’ll tell you the story in a minute, but it got me thinking that sometimes it is difficult to explain how we got to a particular place as the evolution gets buried by layer upon layer of dust. The pharmacy contract is like this, built layer upon layer until it is almost unrecognisable from what it was intended to be at the outset.

Fixed terms would clear out the self-servers

By Rob Darracott This year’s pharmacy election season has not been a classic. Bad behaviour via social media in the RPS English Pharmacy Board election did not see the profession at its best. Without dwelling on the matters that led the Society’s chief executive to issue a post-election statement of disappointment, the online “debate” did cover one issue that deserves a fresh look: term limits. In an election, incumbents have a clear advantage. It can be as simple as name recognition, but when you only need a few hundred votes, waxing lyrical about your “achievements” in office might be enough. Neophyte candidates can win – Thorrun Govind (EPB) and Reena Barai (NPA) both triumphed first time as strong female candidates, but individual successes are hardly cause for celebration unless they are followed by others.

Where should accountability lie?

By David Gallier-Harris, a member of the DHSC’s rebalancing board, writing in a personal capacity The superintendent pharmacist/responsible pharmacist consultation from the rebalancing board reviews the current legislation and proposes moving much from primary legislation to professional regulatory control. One result of these proposals is that failure to comply with a new mixture of GPhC standards, rules and regulatory guidance would become fitness to practise matters, rather than criminal offences, as is currently the case.

Pharmacy can see you sooner

By Stephen Fishwick, NPA head of communications. Eight in 10 people believe NHS access has been eroded in the past decade, but our new report, See You Sooner, suggests community pharmacy can help reverse this trend. The report argues that one cost-effective way to release more capacity into the system would be to develop community pharmacies as neighbourhood health and wellbeing centres – offering support that encompasses prevention, treatment for common ailments, health surveillance and the routine medicines management of long-term conditions, in collaboration with patients’ GP practices. This would have a positive, unblocking effect elsewhere in the health and social care system, with each provider and professional group playing to their strengths.

Community pharmacy: hung out to dry

By secretary of North East London LPC, Hemant Patel. Look how much money is being thrown at GPs while pharmacy funding is slashed. Community pharmacy may not be dead but is definitely on its knees and is being set up to fail and collapse. Simon Stevens, chief executive of the NHS, has a clear plan to separate provision of knowledge-based care from product supply, and make changes at a pace and scale never seen before in the NHS. The consequences for the community pharmacy network are grave.

What can pharmacy learn from optometry?

By Jeremy Holmes, board member of the Association of Optometrists and a former chief executive and registrar of the RPS. In the face of pharmacy’s funding cuts, is there something useful pharmacists can learn from the way optometrists operate? Many community pharmacists look at optometry with something approaching envy. There are obvious similarities – a professional, regulated service combined with a retail business – but the margins on spectacles look very attractive, and the opportunity to offer regular sight tests, even if they are free, is a great way to build loyalty.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 ... 8 Next

Latest

PSNC outlines key priorities for 2019

PSNC is to seek the views of LPCs on the support they would like from the national negotiating body in 2019

High Court refuses P2U's demand for NPA members' contact details

Pharmacy2U has failed in a legal bid to obtain the contact details of every NPA member following a ruling in the High Co...

Views

More tales of Yuletide woe but let's raise a glass to pharmacy

By Richard Thomas, editor, Pharmacy Magazine. Christmas and the New Year is traditionally a time of hope and renewal, b...

Popular

Pregabalin and gabapentin reclassified as class C drugs

The Government says there has been an increase in fatalities linked to the drugs, which are used to treat nerve pain, ep...

Scotland strategy bearing fruit

By Ross Ferguson Something that caught the eye of many colleagues in England was the announcement that the Scottish Gov...

NiQuitin Stoptober campaign

Perrigo is launching a new NiQuitin marketing campaign led by real-life quitters for this year’s Stoptober, which ...



This website is for healthcare professionals, people who work in pharmacy and pharmacy students. By clicking into any content, you confirm this describes you and that you agree to Pharmacy Magazine's Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.

We use essential, performance, functional and advertising cookies to give you a better web experience. Find out how to manage these cookies here. We also use Interest Based Advertising Cookies to display relevant advertisements on this and other websites based on your viewing behaviour. By clicking "Accept" you agree to the use of these Cookies and our Cookie Policy.