John Bell & Croyden wins national retail award

Central London’s John Bell & Croyden store was the winner of ‘New Store of the Year’ in the Retail Week Awards 2017, beating competition from John Lewis, Jigsaw, B&Q, and Mamas & Papas and other leading retailers.

The holder of the Royal Warrant, dating back to 1912, underwent a multi-million pound refurbishment in 2015.

The refurbishment of the heritage building to a modern pharmacy environment incorporated period style features and has antique pharmaceutical tools and storage vessels on display. A dedicated area for the Betterlife independent and mobility living aid range features a distinctive British Jaguar XF car boot on the wall, so customers can see how larger mobility products can fit into their cars.

The project moved an “uninspiring” store to an iconic “future of pharmacy”, said Cormac Tobin, managing director of Celesio UK & Ireland.

“Now I believe John Bell & Croyden is the future of pharmacy; it is an icon in its field and we want our vision to set the new standard for pharmacies all over the world.”

The store showcases how pharmacy should be interacting with patients, he said.

“Its dedicated first care clinics and professional pharmacy teams engage with patients with authenticity and authority. It’s a pharmacy that invests time into its patients and customers; recognising their needs and delivering them in an informed and efficient manner in beautiful surroundings.”

Retail Week judges congratulated the team on “a revamp fit for a Queen”, commenting: “pharmacy is a very difficult sector to bring alive with a really incredible experience, but John Bell & Croyden has done it”.

Robin Winfield, operations director at John Bell & Croyden, added: “The challenge throughout the refurbishment was to remain sympathetic to the store’s heritage, but providing customers and patients with a contemporary twist to engage them throughout the shopping experience. I believe we have been successful in tying its heritage and the needs of the modern customer together.”

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