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Naproxen April concessions projected to cost NHS £1.1m

The Department of Health and Social Care announced the final list of price concessions for April on April 29. 

The list of 16 medicines below, published by the PSNC, came after previous announcements of 30 concession prices on April 16 and 25 prices on April 18.

Drug Pack size Price concession
Bumetanide 1mg tablets 28 £1.39
Candesartan 8mg tablets 28 £2.30
Co-careldopa 25mg/100mg tablets 100 £10.00
Finasteride 5mg tablets 28 £1.34
Irbesartan 75mg tablets 28 £2.18
Irbesartan 150mg tablets 28 £3.16
Nebivolol 5mg tablets 28 £5.29
Pantoprazole 20mg tablets 28 £1.73
Pantoprazole 40mg tablets 28 £3.65
Quetiapine 200mg tablets 60 £12.78
Quetiapine 300mg tablets 60 £9.99
Riluzole 50mg tablets 56 £115.68
Risedronate sodium 35mg tablets 4 £7.27
Telmisartan 80mg tablets 28 £6.62
Tolbutamide 500mg tablets 28 £22.70
Topiramate 50mg tablets 60 £12.27

 

The team behind OpenPrescribing, a tool that provides a search interface onto raw prescribing data from NHS BSA, project that price concessions for generic medicines will cost the NHS an additional £7,265,7756 in April. They arrived at this figure by combining drug tariff and price concession data for April with the latest available prescribing data, which is from February 2019.

Naproxen 250mg tablets account for the largest projected overspend (projected additional cost of £713,599 in April on top of 'usual' monthly cost of £478,904), with Naproxen 500mg tablets projected to cost an additional £368,451 – bringing the total overspend on the drug to £1.08m.

The April figures point to a significant drop from the projected overspend for March – which saw a record 96 concession prices granted – according to OpenPrescribing, with concessions for that month projected to cost the NHS an additional £16,927,914 over and above payment at Drug Tariff prices.

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