Vitamin D supplements may reduce fracture risk in children less than six years of age, the American Journal of Epidemiology reports.

Researchers matched 206 healthy children with a fracture (aged 43 months) with 343 controls and adjusted for potential confounders such as skin type, fracture history, waist circumference, outdoor play and birth weight.

Neither serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration nor intake of cows’ milk significantly reduced fracture risk but children who took vitamin D supplements were 58 per cent less likely to fracture a bone than controls. The 24 per cent reduction in children who used multivitamins was not statistically significant

The authors comment that longitudinal studies should “elucidate the role of vitamin D in early-childhood fracture risk”.

DOI: 10.1093/aje/kww204

Recommended

Obesity increases RA risk in women

A study presented at the European Congress of Rheumatology has shown that obese women have a higher RA risk

Aspirin may protect against breast cancer in diabetes

Long-term low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of breast cancer in women with diabetes

Popular

Health checks and diabetes prevention New Style

This module provides an update on both the NHS Health Check and NHS diabetes prevention programmes

CPD: Anxiety disorders in adults New Style

This module will help you understand the main types of anxiety disorder and their therapeutic management

Dovonex is switched from POM to P

Dovonex Psoriasis Ointment (calcipotriol 50mcg/g) has been reclassified as a P medicine, the MHRA has announced